Logomania – BookF27

Logomania

Max MaraBalenciagaFendi

Bringing back the anti-humble trend of the 1990’s and making space for the new-rich of this world, logomania is the one trend that we might never be able to fully grasp or get rid of!  That’s for those of us who love clothes and fashion for what it is and absolutely not for what it could represent when it comes to social class or status. We will forever be in total agreement with Bottega Veneta as “our own initials are enough”!

With Max Mara announcing their monogram (totally unnecessary if you ask us) last month, we’re discovering that brands nowadays are branding more than usual and using visible logos more than ever. Whatever happened to the embossed empreinte logos? These discrete all-over logos meant for your eyes only?  Gucci has become Guccy and is placed on handbags and t-shirts, the Famous FF by Fendi is now on products like fur coats and monokinis and whether it’s vintage Chanel or new Louis Vuitton, these logos are being positioned in areas we’d rather not seek attention to. Let us not forget Dior latest monogram bag that we all wished did not exist. Instead of elevating the brand, this trend that won’t go away is ultimately making the products look cheap, accessible aka not luxurious. This to say that they do still want to be considered as luxury brands.

After asking ourselves over and over again why they continue to go down this route, we came to the conclusion that, the brands are probably doing it so that their customers can feel an even greater sense of belonging to a “fashion tribe”. Although simultaneously “logomania” has created new opportunities for knock-off markets and businesses to increase. Everyone wants that logo-tee from Gucci or that Louis Vuitton x Supreme hoodie. It’s also a way for the brands to gain more popularity, reach a larger audience. Some of these items such as phone cases, tees , and scarfs cost less than regular products, and to the non-insiders it looks like these brands are having an obvious increase in sales.

By Anne-Isabelle Saint-Pierre